History

The LAPS story

In 1962, Los Angeles artists Connor Everts and Paul Darrow began discussing ways to improve the perception of printmaking as an art form. They decided that the best method to accomplish this goal would be to improve exhibition opportunities, educate the public, and popularize printmaking as an art form. They received support and encouragement from Ken Ross, of the newly formed Los Angeles Arts Commission, and Ebria Feinblatt of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. They were joined by artists Leonard Edmondson, June Wayne, Ynez Johnston, Emerson Woelffer, Guy Maccoy, Dick Swift, Tom Fricano and others to form the Los Angeles Printmaking Society.

Within a year, by-laws were drawn up and LAPS was incorporated as a non-profit organization. The organization began with thirty invited members. In the early years LAPS was fortunate to have the support of a wonderful artist and patron, Esther Lewis, who generously donated studio and gallery space on the second and third floors at 818 Spring Street in downtown Los Angeles. At that time LAPS was a small cooperative organization providing various services, including gallery and studio space to its members.

Over the years, the local LAPS group has expanded and now is an international society of well over 400 artist/printmakers from all across the USA, including members in Canada, Europe, Australia, South Korea and Egypt. New applicants are juried in every other year by distinguished jurors during the LAPS National exhibitions and by fellow members twice a year. LAPS members include artists, curators, educators and collectors. LAPS offers Associate, Student, and Patron memberships and encourages participation of all members in membership and exchange exhibitions, symposia and print related journalism.

In 1973 the first "LAPS National Print Exhibition" was held at the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery in Barnsdall Park. James Brown, director of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, juried it. One hundred and eleven works were selected from 800 entries. The Grunwald Center for the Graphic Arts at UCLA hosted the Seventh, Eighth and Ninth National exhibitions.

Since 1973, LAPS has sponsored a National Print Exhibition approximately every two years with the 20th National in 2009 returning to the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery once again. Unlike many other print exhibitions, LAPS includes recent work from the major presses that are so prominent in Los Angeles, encouraging a thorough dialogue of the contemporary print. Artists of international stature exhibit alongside local and national artists juried into the show. Many generous vendors, corporations, organizations and private collectors have been supporters of the National Exhibition, donating cash awards and purchase prizes.

Over the years, jurors have included Peter Frank, Archana Horsting, Ruth Weisberg, Kevin Salatino, Ed Ruscha, Nathan Oliveira, Ynez Johnston, Laddie John Dill, Henry Hopkins, Elizabeth Smith, Bruce Davis to name a few. In 1995, LAPS began organizing with a consortium of galleries in Los Angeles to exhibit prints and print related exhibitions in conjunction with the National Exhibition.

Besides the National, LAPS sponsors many member exhibitions and exchange shows. Exhibitions have been held not only in Los Angeles, but also in Ireland, South Korea, France, Great Britain, Sweden, Norway among the locations.

LAPS publishes a newsletter called Interleaf and a journal, Newsprint. The organization continues in its educational role by sponsoring symposia, student portfolio critiques, and offering low-cost student memberships.

From the initial conversation between two artists in 1962, the Los Angeles Printmaking Society has grown and enriched the art of printmaking and created an active community beyond its founder’s expectations.

LAPS logo created by Connor Everts circa 1963:

LAPS logo created by Connor Everts circa 1963.

In her studio practice, Jennifer Anderson Printz gravitates towards labor- and time-intensive processes from intricate graphite drawings to making thousands of small delicate cuts in paper with an X-acto knive. The artist’s touch is extremely important to her as it creates an intrinsic presence within her work reflecting a fragility of memory and the phenomena of meaning. Her work has been exhibited in solo and group exhibitions across the United States and abroad and has been included in publications as diverse as Tricycle and The Carolina Quarterly. Her project have also included  massive mural for the Taubman Museum of Art titled Resolute Understanding of Fragile Things.
The content of my work is inspired by the relevance of cross cultural and historical story and myth and how it is relevant in today’s world. I’m interested in how we rely on these stories to make sense of our lives and the light in which we view the world’s problems. As I research elements that find their way into my work what holds my interest is how they are timeless ideas that are also universal. I aspire to push the boundaries of my medium. Woodcut is a constant element in my work, as I love the carving, feel and expressive quality of the wood. It is a connection to the earth and to the history of communication. Each new block carries forth from the blocks before but something new is added to the story, marking my woodblock figures in the way we tattoo our bodies.
Joseph Vorgity is a contemporary realist watercolorist and printmaker. His still life, landscape, and figurative subject matter are recongnized by strong flat areas of color with sharp lines to delineate shapes. Some themes are narrative, others have a surreal quality while many are created primarily for their beauty and visual impact.  Some of the figurative pieces are modeled after traditional religious pictures of saints and deities while others are related to figures in Japanese woodblock prints of the early 20th century. His strongest influences come from the American Precisionist Movement, the Arts and Craft Movement, and from Japonisme.    A majority of Vorgity's woodblock prints are made in the Provincetown white line style. Multi-color prints are pulled from one matrix block with a white line separating each color shape. The prints area hand rendered with watercolor giving them the visual quality of paintings.  Each white line print has an anticipated edition of 50. Vorgity was introduced to the method in 1982 by Ferol Sibley Warthen, a major proponent of the technique in Provincetown.    Joseph also produces traditional limited edition multi-color woodblock prints, and Japanese moku hanga woodblock prints. He studied the Japanese technique with Takuji Hamanaka, Matthew Brown, and William Paden.     Having first studied advertising and illustration in his home town of Philadelphia, Vorgity moved to New York City in 1978 to attend the painting program at the School of Visual Arts. Don Nice, Don Eddy, and Elizabeth Murray were influential teachers. He holds a BFA from the School of Visual Arts and later received a Master's Degree from Fordham University. Joseph was an educator on the elementary and secondary levels for 18 years. He has also worked for the wardrobe departments of Broadway and Opera productions. He was featured in an article about his woodblock prints in the October 1999 issue of American Artist Magazine. 
Kathryn Maxwell‘s recent installations, 3-dimensional graphic works, and prints, examine points of intersection of science, spirituality and art, as they help define our understanding of what it means to be human and our relationship to the universe. Her works have been exhibited throughout the U.S as well as numerous other countries, most recently, China. Venues include Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee, Scotland; Denver Art Museum; Detroit Institute of Art; and the Indianapolis Art Center. She has been awarded artist residencies in China, Greece, Scotland, South Dakota, and Wyoming. Maxwell received her MFA from the University of Wisconsin, Madison and BA from Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois.She currently resides in Tempe, AZ where she is a Professor in the School of Art at Arizona State University.
Valentina Mogilevskaya Quezada was born in Odessa, Ukraine and grew up in Los Angeles, California, where she currently lives.  Valentina earned a bachelor’s degree in fine art from UCLA in 2012, where she also minored in Visual and Performing Arts Education. She is a practicing artist and educator working throughout the greater Los Angeles area in organizations such as the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Hollywood Bowl, and Barnsdall Arts. She is currently the Youth and Family Programs Specialist at the USC Pacific Asia Museum. Valentina’s artistic practice is influenced by her heritage, soviet history, and Surrealism. Her art explores themes of female aesthetics, Eastern and Western binaries, and familial lineage. She works in multiple mediums including collage, intaglio printmaking, drawing, and painting in her Koreatown studio.
More Laps Members 
Graphica America at MoLAA
May 5, 2019

LA Printmaking members are invited to join us for a special Board meeting and the 2019 Foundation Awards at the Museum of Latin American Art ( MoLAA) in Long Beach. After the meeting and award presentation, you are invited to visit the new exhibition at MoLAA, Grafica America.
If you would like to attend, please RSVP.
Museum opens at 11:00AM and Meeting will begin
promptly  at 11:30 in a private meeting area.

Gráfica América presents works by artists representing print shops, publishing houses, and artist collectives from throughout the United States, México, Central America, South America and the Caribbean. The exhibition celebrates the collaborative spirit of printmaking through historical prints and publications as well as contemporary traditional and experimental works made in collective studios and workshops established by Latin American and Latinx printmakers.

Gráfica América, is organized by the Museum of Latin American Art and is curated by Gabriela Martínez, MOLAA Curator of Education and Rogelio Gutiérrez, Professor of Printmaking at Arizona State University - School of Art.

LA Printmaking Board Meeting and 2019 Foundation Awards:
Sunday May 5th,

11:00 to 12:30: Board Meeting
12:30 to 1:00: Foundation Awards

Congratulations to our four student winners!
Adrienne Kinsella--------CSUN
Cherianna Crary---------CSULB
Hailee Ricardo ———  CSULB
David Pacheco-----------Mt. San Antonio College

Afterwards, everyone is invited to see the exhibition "Gráfica América”!

Location: Museum of Latin American Art (MoLAA)
628 Alamitos Avenue, Long Beach, CA, 90802

DianeMcLeod_Tear Down Tear Drop
April 26, 2019

JOIN US FRIDAY APRIL 26th for a special closing reception for the 2019 Spring LA Printmaking exhibition, Sweet Earth/Bitter Earth. Artist talks on artwork selected by juror Merion Estes will be followed by a special presentation and plant raffle by David Newsom, founder of The Wild Yards Project.

Last opportunity to see this wonderful exhibition before it closes, meet the artists and learn more about turning our yards into natural native habitats.

Closing Reception: Friday April 26th, 7:00PM to 8:30PM
Center for the Arts Eagle Rock 2225 Colorado Blvd. LA CA 90041

SELF HELP GRAPHICS & ART * PRINTMAKING SUMMIT • April 18 - 20, 2019
April 19, 2019

Self Help Graphics & Art is proud to host our bi-annual Printmaking Summit April 18-20, 2019 with demonstrations, workshops, panel discussions and artist talks focused on the role printmaking in today’s creative economy for students, emerging artists and skilled national printmakers. Admission to the summit is $25.00 (3-day pass) or $15.00 for students with a valid I.D. (3-day pass).

Participants of this three-day networking and skill-building event will learn about new technologies and green practices in printmaking, participate in demonstrations led by artists and an art exchange program, portfolio reviews, meet art supply vendors, among other activities. The Printmaking Summit’s mission is to build bridges among master printers, emerging and seasoned artists, as well as aspiring youth toward a solid foundation in printmaking.

Purchase Your Ticket

                                                                            Printmaking Summit Registration

The Printmaking Summit will conclude on Saturday, April 20, 2019 with an opening reception of Utopia/ Dystopia, a portfolio of fine art prints created in the form of a deck of 52 playing cards. Curated by Artist and Printmaker, Miyo Stevens-Gandara, twenty-six artists were invited to create two cards for the deck to create their interpretation of utopia and dystopia. The deck of cards allows the project to bring many different artists and styles together creating one unified artwork- a full deck, redefining a traditional portfolio. The concept of a deck of cards is intended to reference many things- games of chance, luck, fortune, war, solitude, precarious situations (house of cards), magic, empire, and divination. It serves as a container for many ideas, and each artist has chosen their own direction.

Artists include Pavel Acevedo, Kay Brown, Ada Pullini Brown, Leslie Dolin, Usen Gandara, Miyo Stevens-Gandara (Curator), Luis Genaro Garcia, J. Leigh Garcia, Margaret Griffith, Rogelio Gutierrez, Phung Huynh, Dongeun Lee, Kelvin Lopez, Rosalie Lopez, Sandra Low, Poli Marichal, Álvaro D. Márquez, Dalila Mendez, Wayne Perry, Sandy Rodriguez, Victor Rosas, Marianne Sadowski, Dewey Tafoya, Alex Fridrich-Ward, Christian Salcedo Ward and Andi Xoch.

Each day the evening portion of the Printmaking Summit is open to the public. RSVP here to attend one of the following events:
Thursday, April 18, 6 - 6:45 p.m. Keynote Speaker, Alison Sar *RSVP Required
Friday, April 19, 5 - 6 p.m. Artists Exchange *RSVP Required
Friday, April 19, 6 - 7 p.m. Public Sale *RSVP Required
Saturday, April 20, 5:30 - 8 p.m. Artists Exchange *RSVP Required

More Laps News 

Our Supporters 

LAPS brought to you in part by
pasadenda art alliance
ifpda
dca