Colleen Premer | " Aerial" | monoprint with chine colle

Colleen Kennedy Premer

http://www.chemersgallery.com/tag/colleen-kennedy-premer/

Moving through the artistic process intuitively and without conscious thought, Colleen Premer taps into her artistic soul to produce balanced and harmonious compositions. This southern California printmaker is lured by the world of monotype and monoprint for the immediacy of results, but she also lends her creative hand to encaustic painting and intaglio printmaking.

Colleen is highly influenced by her artist mother, Elaine Kennedy, who was an acclaimed local painter and printmaker. She was exposed to the art world at an early age through her mother’s circle of friends and the many art shows, exhibitions and gatherings they frequented together. Although Colleen has a journalism degree and an M.S. in clinical psychology, her passion for art kept tugging at her heart. She eventually discovered printmaking at the Idyllwild School of Music and the Arts.

Ranging from abstracted shapes to intricate design, Colleen’s body of work takes its inspiration from observed line, shape and color. She often contrasts recognizable elements, like a spinning Ferris wheel, with shadowed spheres and elongated patterns. Her creativity doesn’t stop there! Colleen also works with chine colle, image transfer and printers inks for a multi-layered print that is steeped in meaning. Some of her more recent works have embedded excerpts of letters written by Colleen’s mother, creating timeless memories.

Always pushing herself to solve a problem from a different angle, Colleen’s work reinvents the familiar to present it in a new and unusual way. Her recent Tattoo Truck linocut relief print boldly presents the cab of a big rig head on. With careful control, Colleen has carved and outlined tattooed flames licking the outer shell of the cab. Rougher cuts add dimension within the image’s background. Colleen’s inspiration largely is drawn from her attraction to the clean lines and human-like features of cars and trucks. Additionally, the methods and history of Japanese printmaking and artistry (including the culture’s unique take on tattoos) intrigue Colleen. The result is extraordinary!

Ever changing, always experimenting, creating beauty out of the mundane, Colleen surprises us with a greater level of sophistication every time we see her newest works. And, we would love to share them with you!

Ruth Weisberg works primarily in painting, drawing, printmaking and large-scale installations. Artist and professor, she is the former Dean of Fine Arts at the University of Southern California since 1995. Ruth Weisberg is represented by Jack Rutberg Fine Arts in Los Angeles. Weisberg is well known for her paintings reflecting upon the cycle of life; the continuity of generations. The artist also has long held interests in preservation, extinction and survival. Since her arrival in Los Angeles in 1969, Ruth Weisberg has been a formidable influence and mentor to decades of artists in this city and beyond. Her first major survey in Los Angeles was in 1979 at the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery. She was the first artist exhibited at The Women’s Building (Judy Chicago was simultaneously presented with a solo exhibition to inaugurate that venue). With more than 80 solo exhibitions and nearly 200 group exhibitions internationally, Weisberg is the first living painter to have been afforded a solo exhibition at the Norton Simon Museum of Art in 2008-2009. Weisberg also holds that distinction at The Huntington Library. Ruth Weisberg has executed many ambitious large-scale works, including the 94-foot mixed-media painting “The Scroll,” which was exhibited at the Skirball Cultural Center. She painted the 29-foot mural “New Beginnings: One Hundred Years of Jewish Immigration” as part of a commission from the UJA Federation. The mural was installed in the headquarters’ entrance in New York City. Ruth Weisberg’s work is included in the permanent collections of over 60 museums, including the Metropolitan Museum, National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., Whitney Museum of American Art, Portland Art Museum, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Getty Research Institute, Norton Simon Museum, Art Institute of Chicago, Detroit Institute of Arts, Biblioteque Nationale in Paris, and the Instituto Nationale per la Grafica in Rome, among many others.
My journey into printmaking is informed by early work in the screen-printing industry. After graduating from the University of Oregon in Fine and Applied arts, I went to work at Bay Street Productions in Oregon as a color matcher and screen-printer for fine custom wallpapers. From there I’ve built a busy full time studio practice, making art daily. In addition to printmaking, I work in painting, ceramics, jewelry, fabric and combined techniques.The ancient tradition of the print is always at the heart of the work. Now decades into this journey, the pleasure of process and a newfound freedom with materials and techniques keeps it all moving into new territory. I make prints not as copies or reproductions at all. Silkscreen yields the jazzy and juicy layers of color, and clear shapes. Intaglio and monotype renders deep blacks of varying densities and values. Chine collé provides “moving parts” in the form of favored shapes and colors. Layering of colors, use of multiple plates, evolving plates, and marks allows the medium to “talk back” at some point. I treat printmaking as an open ended and ongoing investigation into a hidden world.Most recently I have established screen-printing courses at the Schack Art Center in Everett, Washington, and at the Kirkland Arts Center in Kirkland, Washington. In 2014 I taught a reduction screen-print workshop in Venice, Italy at the Scuola di Grafica. I worked in 2015 at the Skopelos Foundation in Greece. I am an active member of Print Arts Northwest, Seattle Print Arts, and Los Angeles Printmakers Society. Many of the hand-printed silkscreen prints are placed in national and international collections. At present my studios in Kirkland Washington, and in Downtown Los Angeles are open by appointment.While all this history is of value, real life is lived in the joy of process, in a world of visual wonder. My mission is to continue to share it, and to live it fully every day.
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